Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Don’t Let Employee Turnover Sabotage Your Key Control

Resignation letter in employee's box of belongings
Employee turnover is a topic you’ve likely heard a lot about recently. The total turnover rate — including terminations and voluntary departures — across all industries nationwide has increased each year since 2014. In 2018, the turnover rate reached 19.3 percent — up from 15.7 percent in 2014. In fact, the voluntary turnover rate on its own was at 14.2 percent in 2018.

While it isn’t impossible to reduce turnover in your organization, it can feel like fighting an uphill battle. This isn’t good for businesses, as it costs anywhere between six to nine months’ salary on average to replace a salaried employee.

However, the effects turnover has on businesses is more serious than you may realize. In addition to being expensive, attrition can also create holes in your organization’s key management practices. Here are the three main ways that turnover will sabotage your key control.

Former Employees Retain Key Access


When employees who had access to keys leave the company, failing to revoke access privileges and collect all keys in their possession immediately after they leave is a major risk to your facility. Imagine the damage they could do with a key or two — or even a couple hundred, like a man in North Dakota, who managed to steal 200 apartment keys, as well as 38 garage openers, master keys, and nine vehicle keys from two separate former employers.

While this may be an extreme example, it’s worth mentioning because it illustrates the potential consequences of not having the necessary tools or policies to secure your keys. An electronic key control system would be able to deter ex-employees from stealing your keys, thanks to features like biometric logins and a secure drawer that can only be opened by authorized users.

Once you have a system in place, it’s important to make sure you collect any keys in an employee’s possession when they leave, as well as strip any access they had to the keys on all systems to protect your organization from security risks related to former employees.

Experienced Employees Take Their Knowledge With Them


Another potential problem that turnover causes for key control is when your key control officer/administrator or other experienced employees leave your organization, taking valuable knowledge with them.

Whether an employee had valuable experience and detailed knowledge of key security policies, losing them hurts. But you can do multiple things to help overcome the loss.

One of these things is to document all key control policies, which helps new employees you bring in as replacements (more on that later). To encourage employees to follow policy, you can use an electronic key control system to help enforce your key management protocol. You could start by assigning user access levels for each employee. That way, anyone without access for certain keys won’t be able to sign them out — or steal them.

One final way to ensure you aren’t left out to dry when experienced employees leave is to assign more than one person to be in charge of key control. If possible, you should look at people with more than one year at your company and who are familiar with how things are run.

New Employees Aren’t up to Speed


When you experience turnover and replace the old employees with new ones, the new staff members lack the knowledge about the way your company runs and won’t be familiar with every policy right away. This lack of knowledge may cause them to make mistakes or be slow with decision making. Once again, this is a great example of why you should document all policies and ensure employees are familiar with them.

If you do have an electronic key control system in place already, new employees may experience a learning curve as they familiarize themselves with how your business uses the system. To make this process as smooth as possible, take advantage of all training resources your key control provider offers. These may include best practices guides, live video training, and phone support.

Experienced employees leaving and inexperienced ones coming in make the job of protecting keys a little more difficult, but it doesn’t have to be so hard. If you take the necessary precautions, you can stay on top of the key control game. Just because your employees are leaving doesn’t mean your key control has to go with them.