Monday, February 17, 2020

A Simple Guide to Key Control Jargon

Wooden mannequin surrounded by question marks
Every industry has jargon that’s confusing to the average person. This can cause problems when industry professionals try to communicate with anyone outside their area of expertise. In the UK, for example, medical terminology became so confusing to patients that misunderstandings began affecting quality of care. As a result, the Royal College of General Practitioners told doctors to avoid jargon when speaking with patients.

While key and access control lingo isn’t so complicated that it’s almost a language in itself like medical terminology, we do believe that clear communication is crucial to helping businesses.

Whether you’re researching key management methods for your business or need to order parts for your electronic key control system and aren’t sure what they’re called, the following list of terms is for you.

Common Key Control Terms


Audit Trail — A key control audit trail includes reports with specific details each time someone uses a key. This data includes who removed it, when and why they removed it, and when the key was returned. Also called a key control log. Read more about why audit trails are important.

Access Card — A plastic card that, like a credit card, is programmed with data that only a special sensor can read. It provides access to restricted areas or systems. View an access card

Control Panel — The part of an electronic key control system where a user performs system functions such as checking out keys, running reports, and adding new users. It often includes a touchscreen. View a control panel.

Eyelet — A metal ring that’s used along with a rivet stem and washer (both terms defined below) to attach keys to key tags. View photos and order supplies from our online catalog (current customers only).

Key Fob — A keychain-sized piece of hardware that restricts access to secure areas or systems. It grants entry by generating a random code, emitting an electronic signal, or being scanned by a special reader. Car key remotes are one of the most common types of fobs. View a key fob.

Lockbox — A small, hinged box containing a set of keys. They’re commonly attached to house doors in the real estate industry and to car windows in the automotive industry. Read more about lockboxes.

Key Tag — A paper or plastic identifier that’s attached to a set of keys. Some tags, especially paper ones, have the key’s information written directly on them. Others have an embedded computer chip that’s coded with information about the key. These key tags are used with an electronic key control system and are more secure than labeled tags. Learn why it’s helpful to set up a key tag preparation station.

Key Control Log — Another name for an audit trail. The key control log is a set of reports with details about each transaction.

Key Plug System — An updated version of the traditional wooden pegboard. Keys are attached to pegs and inserted into slots on a numbered board. Also called a mechanical peg system or lock plug system.

Module — A component of a mix-and-match system; think of it as one piece of a puzzle. For example, the KeyTrak Guardian allows customers to choose modules for lockers, keys, or cards.

Pegboard — A board with regularly spaced holes that hold hooks. Keys or other items are placed on the hooks. View a pegboard.

Reader — An electronic user authentication method that scans a piece of hardware such as a fob or biometric characteristic such as a fingerprint. Read about why you should use fingerprint readers with your key control system.

Rivet Stem — A long, thin metal piece that’s used along with a washer (defined below) and eyelet to attach keys to key tags.

Server — A computer that controls an electronic key control system. View a key control system server

Zap Strap — A thin rubber-coated wire that’s used to attach keys to key tags.

Proximity Card — Another name for an access card.

Washer — A donut-shaped metal piece that’s used along with a rivet stem and eyelet to attach keys to key tags.

To learn more about key management, read “A Four-Minute History of Key Control” and “Do You Need to Improve Your Key Management?