Friday, July 10, 2015

How to Catch Fishy Miles on Your Fleet Vehicles

Fishing boat
Give a man a fish and you'll feed him for a day. Give a man a company car and he'll rack up extra miles on the way to a weekend deep sea fishing trip.

Fishy miles — or rather mystery miles — can be a major headache for companies with vehicle fleets. While employees' reasons for unauthorized use of company vehicles usually aren't as extravagant as weekend fishing trips in search of Jaws, the extra miles employees put on poorly managed fleet vehicles can result in increased operating costs and decreased vehicle life spans.

In honor of Shark Week coming to a close, here are some ways you can reel in would-be adventurers and keep fishy miles on your fleet vehicles from reaching oceanic proportions.

Limit Key Access


Keeping track of your fleet vehicles should start with knowing who has keys and when they have them. An electronic key control system should not only store keys in a secure drawer or cabinet but also offer multiple access levels to limit who can take what keys. It should also require employees to log in, scan a fingerprint or swipe a card to gain access to keys.

Receive Reports on Key Activity


In the same way correctly reporting miles is crucial to effective fleet management, getting reports on key activity is an important aspect of managing your fleet's keys. An electronic key control system should keep automatic records of when a key was checked out, who took it and how many miles a vehicle had at checkout and check-in. This sort of reporting provides an audit trail that protects your organization from liability.

Use System Alerts for Added Security


You need to know immediately if an employee tries to take a fleet car without proper authorization. When the employee attempts to access the system or a specific key, an electronic key control system should alert you by sounding an audible alarm and/or sending you a text or email. Alerts allow you to react quickly and keep the fleet under control.

Not convinced that your employees might misuse company vehicles? Read our post "What an Unconventional Bank Robber Can Teach Us About Fleet Management."

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